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708 BC
Lampis of Sparta won the pentathlon becoming the 1st Olympic winner in the long jump.
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573 BC
Nemea, 70 miles from Athens, became the site for the Olympic games.
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444 BC
Ikos of Tarentum won the Olympic Pentathlon. He gave up sex as part of his training regimen.
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384 Sep 9
Flavius Honorius, emperor East Roman Republic (395-423), was born.
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396
The last Olympic Games were held under Emp. Theodosius I, who halted them due to increasing professionalism and corruption. [see 393CE] In 2004 Nigel Spivey authored “The Ancient Olympics.”
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1850
The Wenlock Olympian Games were set up by Dr. William Penny Brookes in Much Wenlock, England. A typical program of events featured running and leaping competitions and throwing a cricket ball, as well as non-athletic pursuits such as choir singing and awards for reading, arithmetic, knitting and sewing.
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1890 Oct
Dr. William Penny Brookes (81) met Baron Pierre de Coubertin (27) of France, widely regarded as the founder of the modern Olympics, over several hours at the Raven Hotel in Much Wenlock, England. The two spoke about de Coubertin's wish to stage an international Olympic festival in Athens.
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1893 Jun
Pierre de Coubertin convinced the General Assembly of the USFSA, an amateur sporting society, to host a congress in France that would examine the issue of amateurism in sports.
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1894 Jun 16
In France 49 sporting societies from 12 countries participated in a Congress in Paris where delegates discussed amateurism in sports and the revival of the Greek olympics. By the end of the congress on June 23, Pierre de Coubertin won unanimous approval to revive the games.
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1895 Feb
Georgios Averoff, a Greek philanthropist, agreed to pay for the rebuilding of the Panathenaic stadium in Athens for the upcoming revival of the Olympics.
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1896 Apr 15
The first modern Olympic Games closed in Athens. 164 of the 241 competitors were from Greece. The remaining represented 13 countries, the largest international participation of any sporting event up to that time.
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1901
Pieces of an ancient Greek calculating machine, called the Antikythera Mechanism, were discovered by sponge divers exploring the remains of a shipwreck off the tiny island of Antikythera. Radiocarbon dating suggested it was built around 65 BC, but in 2006 newly revealed lettering on the machine indicate a slightly older construction date of 150 to 100 BC. In 2008 researchers said the device, which originally contained 37 gears, included the cycle of the Greek Olympics.
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1908
At the Olympic games in England, Russia objected to separate medal totals and flag-flying for athletes from Finland, die to its control over Finland. The Finns marched with no flag.
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1920 Apr 20
The VII Olympiad opened in Belgium. The Olympic oath and flag showing 5 interlocking rings as a symbol of the 5 continents made their first appearance at the Antwerp Olympics. Germany, Austria, Bulgaria, Turkey and Hungary were not invited and the new Soviet Union decided not to attend.
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1920
The Olympics dropped the tug-of-war event.
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1924 Jan 25
The 1st Winter Olympic games opened in Chamonix, France.
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1924 Feb 4
The 1st Winter Olympic games closed at Chamonix, France.
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1924 May 4
The summer Olympics opened in Paris. The French rugby team beat the Rumanians 61-3.
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1924 May
Gertrude Ederle won a gold medal the summer Olympics in Paris as a member of the US 400-meter relay team.
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1924 Jul 27
The summer Olympics closed in Paris.
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1926 Aug 6
Gertrude "Trudy" Ederle (1905-2003), American Olympic gold medalist, became the first woman to swim the English Channel. Before setting out from Cap Griz-Nez, France, at 7:09 a.m., Ederle coated her body with layers of lard and petroleum jelly to insulate her from the cold waters. On that day, the sea was so rough that steamship crossings had been cancelled, but Ederle swam on in spite of being buffeted by waves and plagued by seasickness. She reached Dover at 9:40 p.m., after swimming the Channel in 14 hours and 39 minutes. This time broke the existing world record of 21 hours and 45 minutes set by British Navy Captain Matthew Webb in 1875. Ederle died Nov 30, 2003. [see Sep 11,1951]
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1928 Jul 28
The Olympics opened at Amsterdam. Track and field events opened for women for the 1st time despite objections from Pope Pius IX. Germany was allowed to participate for the 1st time since WWI.
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1932 Jul 30
The Summer Olympic Games opened in Los Angeles. The US won 41 gold medals, Italy was 2nd with less than a third of that. Bill Miller of Stanford won a gold medal in the pole vault when he cleared 14'-1 ¾". Later in the year he set a world record at 14'-1 7/8". Babe Didriksen (21) of Texas won 2 track gold medals and a silver. Track events in this summer’s Olympics were timed with manual stopwatches.
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1932 Aug 4
Luigi Beccali (1907-1990), Italian athlete, won Olympic gold in the 1500 meters. He gave a Fascist salute at the winners’ podium.
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1936 Feb 6
Adolf Hitler opened the Fourth Winter Olympics in Garmisch-Partenkirchen. 1061 athletes stood at attention half-hidden by a furious blizzard. Austrian and French athletes gave the Nazi salute in passing the revue stand.
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1936 Aug 4
Jesse Owens (1913-1980) won his 2nd Olympic medal (long jump) at the Berlin Olympics.
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1936 Aug 5
Jesse Owens won his 3rd Olympic medal (200m sprint) at the Berlin Olympics.
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1936
The 76,000 seat Berlin Olympic Stadium was designed by Albert Speer.
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1937 Sep 2
Pierre de Coubertin (b.1863), French Baron and the major force behind the revival of the modern Olympics, died.
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1948 Jul 29
Britain's King George VI opened the first Olympics since 1936 in London. Germany and Japan were not invited and the Soviet Union chose not to attend. Alice Coachman of the US was the first black woman to win a gold medal when she triumphed in the high jump. Audrey "Mickey" Patterson-Tyler (1927-1996) was the first black woman to win an Olympic medal. She won a bronze medal in the 200-meter dash.
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1948 Aug 6
Victoria Manalo Draves (1924-2010) became the 1st woman to win 2 diving gold medals, and the 1st Asian American woman to win an Olympic medal.
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1948
Marie Provaznikova, Czech athlete, became the first to defect from a Communist country during the Olympics in London.
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1948
In London, England, Joaquin Capilla (19) of Mexico won a bronze medal for platform diving.
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1952
Bob Mathias (1930-2006), US athlete from California, won his 2nd Olympic decathlon.
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1952
1972
Avery Brundage (1887-1975), American athlete and sports officials, served as president of the International Olympic Committee.
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1952
In the 15th Olympic Games in Helsinki, Finland, Joaquin Capilla (23) of Mexico won an Olympic silver medal, for platform diving.
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1956 Feb 2
Figure skater Tenley Albright became the first American woman to win a gold medal at the Winter Olympics in Italy. She achieved this despite an ankle injury.
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1956 Nov 22
Melbourne, Australia, hosted this summer’s 16th Olympiad. 65 countries and 4,276 athletes competed. Closing ceremonies were held on Dec 8. The Netherlands and Spain withdrew from the Olympics in support of Hungary following Russia’s invasion. 45 athletes from Hungary defected during the games. Egypt, Lebanon and Iraq boycotted the games in protest over British and French actions over the Suez Canal. China boycotted protesting the inclusion of athletes from Taiwan.
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1956
In Australia Joaquin Capilla (27) of Mexico won a bronze medal for springboard diving and a gold for platform diving.
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1956
In Australia Murray Rose (1939-2012) became an Olympic champion winning the first of his three gold medals at the Melbourne Games in the 4 x 200m freestyle relay.
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1960 Feb 18
The Eighth Winter Olympic Games were formally opened in Squaw Valley, Calif., by Vice President Nixon. A drought of snow ended 2 days before the start of the games.
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1960 Aug 26
Knud Jensen (23), Danish cyclist, collapsed while riding in a 100-km team trial at the Olympics in Rome. He fractured his skull and died. An autopsy revealed amphetamines in his blood. His death would led the International Olympic Committee to begin a program of drug testing beginning with the 1968 Games held in Grenoble, France and Mexico City, Mexico.
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1960 Sep 10
Abebe Bikila (1932-1973), barefoot runner from Ethiopia, won the Olympic marathon.
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1960 Sep 11
The 17th Summer Olympics closed in Rome. In 2008 David Maraniss authored “Rome 1960: The Olympics That Changed the World.”
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1961 Jul 1
Carl Lewis (Olympic Gold Medallist: 100 meter & 200 meter sprints, long jump & 4x100 meter relay [1984]; 100 meter in 9.93 seconds, a world record, long jump, 4x100 meter relay [1988], long jump and 4x100 relay [1992]; Olympic Hall of Famer; AP Male Athlete of the Year [1983, 1984]), was born.
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1967 May
The Olympic Committee banned a number of substances including narcotics and amphetamines and announced that small-scale drug-testing would begin at the 1968 Olympics in Grenoble and Mexico City.
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1968 Feb 6
Charles de Gaulle opened the 19th Winter Olympics in Grenoble, France.
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1968 Feb 10
Peggy Fleming of the United States won the gold medal in women's figure skat-ing at the Winter Olympic Games in Grenoble, France.
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1968 Feb 26
Thirty-two African nations agreed to boycott the Olympics because of the pres-ence of South Africa.
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1968 Oct 12
The summer Games of the 19th Olympiad were officially opened in Mexico City by Mexican President Gustavo Diaz Ordaz.
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1968 Oct 16
American athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos (23) sparked controversy at the Mexico City Olympics by giving "black power" salutes during a victory ceremony after they'd won gold and bronze medals in the 200-meter race. In 2011 John Carlos with Dave Zirin authored “The John Carlos Story: The Sports Moment That Changed the World.”
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1968 Oct 18
The US Olympic Committee suspended two black athletes, Tommie Smith and John Carlos, for giving a black power salute as a protest during a victory ceremony in Mexico City. Bob Beamon soared 29 feet, 2 inches, to set a world record in the long jump. In 1976 Dick Schaap authored “The Perfect Jump.”
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1968 Oct 27
The 19th Olympic games closed at Mexico City, Mexico.
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1968 Oct
Miloslava Rezkova-Hubnerovawon (1950-2014) won the gold medal for Czechoslovakia in women's high jump in Mexico City.
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1970 May 15
South Africa was excluded from Olympic play.
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1971 Jul 12
Kristi Tsuya Yamaguchi, figure skater, was born in Hayward, Cal. In 1992 she won an Olympic gold medal.
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1972 Feb 2
Winter Olympics began in Sapporo, Japan.
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1972 Aug 26
The XX Olympiad opened in Munich, Germany. The IOC had withdrawn Rhodesia’s invitation to the summer Olympics after several African nations threatened a boycott.
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1972 Aug 31
At the Munich Summer Olympics American swimmer Mark Spitz won his fourth and fifth gold medals, in the 100-meter butterfly and 800-meter freestyle relay.
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1972 Aug 31
Olga Korbut (b.1955) of Belarus, USSR, won Olympic gold medal in floor exercises and the balance beam.
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