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100000 BC
Hunters stalked giant camels in the Syrian desert about this time. Bones of the “Syrian Camel,” as tall as some modern-day elephants, were discovered 150 miles north of Damascus in 2005.
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3600 BC
1000 BC
The Mesopotamian settlement of Nagar (in northeastern Syria) grew to become one of the first large cities of the Middle East. It began before 6,000BC and continued to about 1000BC.
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2400 BC
The Mesopotamian city of Nagar (in northeastern Syria) became the powerful state of Nagar about this time.
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2300 BC
Akkadian armies conquered Nagar about this time.
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2291 BC
2254 BC
Naram-Sin ruled Akkad. He defeated a rebel coalition in Sumer and re-established Akkadian power. He re-conquered Syria, Lebanon, and the Taurus mountains, destroying Aleppo and Mari in the process. During his reign the Gutians sacked the city of Agade and eventually destroyed all of Sumer (southern Iraq). During his reign Naram-Sin campaigned against the region of Magan (Oman).
Links: , Syria, Lebanon, Akkad, Mesopotamia     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
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1458 BC
In Egypt Queen Hatshepsut, mother of Tuthmosis III, died. Tuthmosis III, in his early thirties, declared war on the Prince of the Syrian city of Kadesh, who had organized a confederacy in Palestine and Syria. Tuthmosis defeated the Syrians following an 8 month siege of Megiddo. In 2007 Egyptian archaeologists said the mummy of an obese woman, who likely suffered from diabetes and liver cancer, has been identified as that of Queen Hatshepsut, Egypt's most powerful female pharaoh. Hatshepsut, who ruled Egypt in the 15th century B.C., was known for dressing like a man and wearing a false beard. But when her rule ended, all traces of her mysteriously disappeared, including her mummy. Discovered in 1903 in the Valley of the Kings, the mummy was left on site until 2007, when it was brought to the Cairo Museum for testing.
Links: Egypt, Syria, HistoryBC     Click to see the source(s) for this event