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1944 Aug 21
1947 Jun 3
Albert Camus edited the clandestine newspaper Combat. In 2006 his WW II pieces, edited by Jacqueline Levi-Valensi, were published as ”Camus at Combat.”
Links: France, Writer, Journalism     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1944
Theodore Adorno and Max Horkheimer authored “Dialectic of Enlightenment,” which examined the culture that gave birth to Auschwitz. This became the founding text of the post modern writers (pomos), later represented by Jean-Francois Lyotard, Roland Barthes, Michel Foucault and Jacques Derrida.
Links: France, Germany, Writer     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1944
Reinhold Niebuhr (1892-1971), US theologist, authored “The Children of Light and the Children of Darkness,” a profound analysis of man and history.
Links: USA, Writer, Books     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1944
Allen Ginsberg and Jack Kerouac met on the campus of Columbia Univ. in NYC. In 2010 Bill Morgan and David Stanford published the edited letters of Ginsberg and Kerouac. Bill Morgan authored “The Typewriter Is Holy: The Complete, Uncensored History of the Beat Generation.”
Links: USA, Poet, NYC, Writer     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1944
Charles Jackson (1903-1968), American writer, authored his novel “The Lost Weekend.”
Links: USA, Writer, Books     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
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1944
Hans Fallada (1893-1947), German writer, was confined to a psychiatric prison after taken a shot at his wife. In 2015 his prison diary was publiched as “A Stranger in My Own Country: The 1944 Prison Diary.”
Links: Germany, Writer, Books     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1944
Sidonie Gabrielle Colette (1873-1954), French actress, librettist, novelist and critic, authored her novel “Gigi,” about a young girl being groomed as a courtesan.
Links: France, Writer, Books     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1945 Oct 8
Felix Salten (b.1869), Austrian writer and the creator of Disney’s Bambi (1923), died in Switzerland. In 1906 he authored the novel Josephine Mutzenbacher, the fictional autobiography of a Vienna prostitute, a notorious pornographic novel.
Links: Austria, Switzerland, Writer     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1945
Karl Popper (1902-1994) authored “The Open Society and Its Enemies.” “Unlimited tolerance must led to the disappearance of tolerance.”
Links: Philosophy, Writer     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1945
Nevil Shute authored “Most Secret,” a novel about a French-crewed trawler that uses a flame thrower against a German gunboat during WW II.
Links: USA, Writer, Books     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
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1945
Carmen Laforet (23), Spanish writer, authored her first novel “Nada” (Nothing). It was set in Spain during the 1930s and conveyed the crushing weight of war through its characters. An English translation became available in 2007.
Links: Spain, Writer, Books     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1945
Carlo Levi (1902-1975), Italian journalist, artist and doctor, authored “Christ Stopped at Eboli,” his first documentary novel.
Links: Italy, Writer, Books     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1945
George R. Stewart, novelist and co-founder of the American name Society authored "Names on the Land," a work of onomastics and patriotic toponymy.
Links: USA, Writer     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1946 Apr
George Orwell (1903-1950), English author and journalist, published his essay “Politics and the English Language.”
Links: Britain, Writer, Journalism, Language     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1946 Jul 27
Gertrude Stein (72), US-French author, poet (Ida, Tender Buttons), died in France. Her work included the murder mystery "Blood on the Dining-Room Floor" and “The Biography of Alice B. Toklas” (1933). She once said of Oakland, Ca.: "There is no there there." Painter Francis Rose carved the headstone on her grave at the Pere Lachaise cemetery. A biography of Stein by Linda Wagner-Martin was published in 1996 titled "Favored Strangers." In 2007 Janet Malcolm authored “Two Lives: Gertrude and Alice.”
Links: USA, France, Writer, SF Bay Area, Biography     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
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1946
Mickey Spillane (1918-2006), comic book writer, authored his first Mike Hammer detective novel, “I, the Jury.”
Links: USA, Writer, Cartoons     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1946
Robert Penn Warren (1905-1989) published his Pulitzer Prize winning novel "All the King’s Men." It was based on the life of Huey Long of Louisiana. In 1949 it was turned into a movie. In 1997 Joseph Blotner wrote Warren’s biography.
Links: USA, Louisiana, Writer, Books     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1946
The term intentional fallacy, an important principle of New Criticism, was first used by W.K. Wimsatt and Monroe Beardsley in their essay "The Intentional Fallacy," in which they said: "the design or intention of the author is neither available nor desirable as a standard for judging the success of a work of literary art." The phrase "intentional fallacy" is somewhat ambiguous, but it means "a fallacy about intent" and not "a fallacy committed on purpose."
Links: USA, Writer     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1946
George Mikes (1912-1987), a Hungarian living in England, published “How to Be An Alien.” It was about a foreigner’s view of England.
Links: Britain, Hungary, Writer, Books     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1946
Halldor Laxness (1902-1998) of Iceland published "Independent People." It helped him win the Nobel Prize in literature in 1955.
Links: Writer, Iceland     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
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1946
The Gormenghast series of three novels by English writer Mervyn Peake (1911-1968) began with “Titus Groan,” which was followed by Gormenghast (1950) and Titus Alone (1959). They featured Castle Gormenghast, and Titus Groan, the title character of the first book.
Links: Britain, Writer, Books     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1947
Vance Bourjaily (d.2010 at 87), Ohio-born author of Lebanese immigrants, published his first novel “The End of Life.”
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1947
Henry Denker (1912-2012), American novelist and playwright, began writing, directing and producing “The Greatest Story Ever Told,” a radio drama on the life of Jesus. The program continued to 1956 and won him a Peabody Award.
Links: USA, Writer, Radio, Playwright     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1947
Hans Fallada (1893-1947), German writer, authored “Every Man Dies Alone.” This was one of the first anti-Nazi novels to be published by a German after World War II.
Links: Germany, Writer, Books     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1947
Dutch writer Gerard Reve (1923-2006) authored his debut novel “De Avonden” (The Evenings) under the pseudonym Simon van het Reve. In 2016 it was translated to English.
Links: Netherlands, Writer, Books     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
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1948
John R. Tunis authored “Highpockets,” a novel centered around baseball.
Links: USA, Writer, Baseball     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1948
Govindas Vishnoodas Desani (1909-2000), Kenya-born Pakistani writer in England, authored “All About Hatterr,” his novel of an absurdist and mystical odyssey in India. In 1968 he was invited to teach at the Univ. of Texas and spent 11 years there.
Links: Britain, India, Pakistan, Writer     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1948
Elizabeth Bowen (1899-1973), Irish-British writer, authored “The Heat of the Day.” It was set amidst the London Blitz of WWII.
Links: Britain, Writer, Books     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1948
Dale Carnegie (1888-1955) authored “How to Stop Worrying and Start Living.”
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1949 Mar 6
Robert Storm Petersen (b.1882), Danish cartoonist, writer, animator, illustrator, painter and humorist, died. He is known almost exclusively by his pen name Storm P.
Links: Writer, Denmark, Cartoons     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
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1949 Oct 29
George Ivanovich Gurdjieff (b.~1866), a Greek-Armenian mystic and spiritual teacher, died in France. His books included “Meetings with Remarkable Men,” the 2nd volume of his “All and Everything” trilogy.
Links: Armenia, France, Writer, Religion     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1949
The conservation classic “A Sand County Almanac” by Aldo Leopold (d.1948) was published.
Links: USA, Environment, Writer, Books     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1949
George Orwell’s (1903-1950) novel "Nineteen Eighty-Four" was published. He was inspired by the Russian author Yevgeny Zamyatin, who wrote an antiutopian novel warning against intoxication with technology. Orwell asserted that technology is an instrument of tyranny. In his novel Orwell described a machine called a versificator that generated music for the masses. “Who controls the past controls the future. Who controls the present, controls the past.”
Links: Britain, Writer, Books     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1949
Dorothy Bussy (d.1960), English novelist and translator, wrote her novella “Olivia.“ Writer Lytton Strachey and translator of Freud, James Strachey, were her brothers.
Links: USA, Writer     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1950
Octavio Paz (36), poet and essayist, published "The Labyrinth of Solitude," his classical study of the Mexican character.
Links: Mexico, Writer, Books     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
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1950
Milan Kundera (b.1929), later renowned as a Czech writer, informed on Miroslav Dvoracek, who had been recruited in Germany by the Czech emigre intelligence network to work as a spy against the Communist regime. Dvoracek was later sentenced to 22 years in prison and eventually served 14, working in uranium mines. Kundera had joined the Communist Party as a student, but was later expelled after criticizing its totalitarian nature. This information was only made public in 2008.
Links: Czechoslovakia, Writer, Espionage     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1950
Mervyn Peake (1911-1968) authored his fantasy novel “Gormenghast.” It was the 2nd of of a 3-novel cycle. The first was “Titus Groan” (1946) and the 3rd was “Titus Alone” (1959).
Links: Writer, Books     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1950
The first German Book Trade Peace Prize was awarded to Max Tau (Adolf Grimme).
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1950
Doris Lessing (1919-2013), British writer, authored her first novel “The Grass Is Singing.” a look at race in Rhodesia and the effect that harsh colonial experience had on both oppressor and oppressed.
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1951 Jul 10
In San Francisco Dashiell Hammett, mystery writer, was sentenced to 6 months in prison for refusing to tell where the Communist party got its bail money. Hammett, who was born in Maryland in 1894, was a Pinkerton detective for eight years and served in the Ambulance Corps in World War I before he began his writing career. Author of The Maltese Falcon (1930) and The Thin Man (1932), Hammett became heavily involved in left-wing political activity in 1934. He was later a trustee of the Civil Rights Congress. Hammett died in 1961.
Links: USA, Writer, SF     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
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1951 Jul 16
"The Catcher in the Rye," a coming-of-age novel by J.D. Salinger (1919-2010), was first published. Holden Caulfield, the main character, became recognized as the quintessential American teenager.
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1951
William F. Buckley Jr. (b.1925), Yale graduate, authored “God and Man at Yale.” It exposed the extraordinarily irresponsible educational attitude that prevailed at his alma mater.
Links: USA, Writer, Connecticut, Education     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1951
Eric Hoffer (1898-1983), American moral and social philosopher, authored “The True Believer: Thoughts on the Nature of Mass Movements.”
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1951
Nirad C. Chaudhuri (1897-1999) published "The Autobiography of an Unknown Indian."
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1951
Vladimir Nabokov (1899-1977) published his memoir under the title “Conclusive Evidence.” In 1996 it was republished as “Vladimir Nabokov: Novels and Memoirs 1941-1951: The Real Life of Sebastian Knight, Bend Sinister, Speak, Memory,” in a 3-volume set. The individual chapters had been published from 1936-1951.
Links: USA, Writer, Biography     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
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1951
Albert Camus (1913-1960), Algeria-born French novelist, wrote "The Rebel." The book asserted a revolt against absurd nonsense and against commitments indifferent to the suffering that revolutionary steamrollers caused.
Links: France, Writer, Books     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1951
William Faulkner authored “Requiem for a Nun.” The past is never dead, it’s not even past.”
Links: USA, Writer, Quote, Books     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1951
Isaac Asimov authored his sci-fi novel “Foundation” (1951), the first of trilogy that began as a series of short stories published from 1942-1950. It imagined a science called psycho-history which enabled practitioners to precisely predict the behavior of large groups of people.
Links: USA, Writer, Books, Sci-Fi     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1951
Graham Greene authored “The End of the Affair.”
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1952 Feb 16
Jan Kerouac (d.1996), novelist daughter of Jack Kerouac, was born. Her books included "Baby Driver" (1981) and "Trainsong" (1988).
Links: USA, Writer     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
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1952 Feb 19
Knut Hamsun (b.1859), Norwegian writer, died. He won the Nobel Prize in literature in 1920. His work included "From the Cultural Life in Modern America" (1889), "Hunger," "The Growth of the Soil," "Victoria," and "An Overgrown Path." A film portrait of his life was produced in 1997. In 2009 Ingar Sletten Kolloen authored “Knut Hamsun: Dreamer and Dissenter.”
Links: Writer, Norway, Biography     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1952
Ralph Ellison (d.1994) wrote his classic novel "Invisible Man." It chronicled the harrowing travels of a nameless black man in the South and New York’s Harlem.
Links: USA, NYC, Writer, Black History     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1952
Charles Einstein (1926-2007), sportswriter and author, wrote “Bloody Spur,” based on the crimes of William Heirens, the “Lipstick Killer,” who terrorized Chicago in the mid-1940s. In 1956 Fritz Lang made the book into a film noir set in NYC called “While the City Sleeps.”
Links: USA, Writer, Books     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1952
Ralph Ellison (1914-1994) wrote his classic novel "Invisible Man." It chronicled the harrowing travels of a nameless black man in the South and New York’s Harlem.
Links: USA, NYC, Writer, Black History     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1952
Edmund Wilson authored “The Shores of Light.” It became recognized as a classic introduction to the 1920s literature of America.
Links: USA, Writer, Books     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
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1952
C.S. Lewis (1898-1963), Irish-born Anglican writer, authored “Mere Christianity,” an explanation of the basic tenets of Christianity.
Links: Britain, Writer, Religion     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1952
Carl G. Jung (1875-1961), Swiss-born psychoanalyst, published his work “Answers to Job.”
Links: Writer, Psychology     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1952
Barnaby Conrad (1922-2013) authored the bestseller "Matador," about the life of Manolete, Spain's greatest bullfighter. He later used royalties from the book to move back to San Francisco and open his El Matador saloon.
Links: Spain, USA, Writer, SF, Books     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1952
Kurt Vonnegut authored his novel “Player Piano,” in which most work was done by machines.
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1953
The World Science Fiction Convention began handing out the Hugo achievement awards named after publisher and inventor Hugo Gernsback (1884-1967).
Links: USA, Writer     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
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