Home
Subject list

Black History

Next     Prev
Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...

1102
In England the Westminster Council outlawed “the selling of men like brute animals.”
Links: Britain, Black History, Slavery     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1589 Apr 4
Benedict of Palermo (b.1524), born in Sicily to Ethiopian slaves, died. He was freed at birth and became known for his charity. Invited as a young man to join a Franciscan hermit group, he became the leader. He was beatified by Pope Benedict XIV in 1743 and canonized in 1807 by Pope Pius VII.
Links: Black History, Sicily, Saint     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1652 May 18
A law was passed in Rhode Island banning slavery in the colonies but it caused little stir and was not enforced. More than 1,000 slave voyages were mounted from Rhode Island, mostly in the 18th century, carrying more than 100,000 Africans into slavery.
Links: USA, Black History, Rhode Island, Slavery     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1695 Nov 20
Zumbi, a Brazilian leader of a hundred-year-old rebel slave group, was killed in an ambush in Palmares. In January 2003 legislation established November 20 as Black Consciousness Day.
Links: Brazil, Black History, Slavery     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1701
In England presiding Chief Justice Lord Hold (1642-1710) ruled that “As soon as a Negro comes into England, he becomes Free.”
Links: Britain, Black History, Slavery     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
We offer additional services to help you as well including tax attorney help with tax relief issues, auto accident attorney services, and sustainable development information to research going green!
1734
In Canada a black slave named Marie-Joseph Angelique was hanged for setting fire to the Montreal home of her master. She became the title character in a 1999 play by Lorena Gale.
Links: Canada, Black History, Slavery     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1741
A slave revolt in New York caused considerable property damage but left people unharmed. Rumors of a conspiracy among slaves and poor whites in New York City to seize control led to a panic that resulted in the conviction of 101 blacks, the hanging of 18 blacks and four whites, the burning alive of 13 blacks and the banishment from the city of 70. In 2005 Anne Farrow, Joel Lang and Jennifer Frank authored “Complicity: The North Promoted, Prolonged and Profited from Slavery,” which included a chapter on the 1941 NYC slave revolt.
Links: USA, NYC, Black History, Slavery     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1765
More than 100 Africans perished on the slave ship Sally in the voyage from Africa. Some hanged themselves or starved to death. Some rebelled and were shot dead or drowned. In 2007 the ship's log book, detailing the deaths of slaves that occurred almost daily aboard the ship, was encased in glass in an exhibit at Brown University.
Links: USA, Black History, Rhode Island, Slavery     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1770
1779
Blacks were 1st brought to Argentina in the 1770s to toil on large haciendas and work as domestic servants.
Links: Argentina, Black History, Slavery     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1772 Jun 22
Slavery was in effect outlawed in England by Chief Justice William Murray, First Earl of Mansfield, following the trial of James Somersett. In 2005 Steven Wise authored “Though the Heavens May Fall: The Landmark Trial that Led to the End of Human Slavery.”
Links: Britain, Black History, Slavery     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
Need someone professional to write a History essay for you? - Writemyessays.com will help you.
1773
Thomas Day, English abolitionist, wrote a poem with his friend John Bicknell called “The Dying Negro.”
Links: Britain, Poet, Black History     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1775 Dec 9
Lord Dunmore (1730-1809), governor of Virginia, lost decisively at the American Revolution Battle of Great Bridge. Following that defeat, Dunmore loaded his troops, and many Virginia Loyalists, onto British ships. Smallpox spread in the confined quarters, and some 500 of the 800 members of his Ethiopian Regiment died.
Links: Britain, Microbiology, Virginia, Black History     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1775
Lord Dunmore, Royal Governor of Virginia, called on local slaves to join the British side to suppress the American Revolution: “When we win we will free you from your shackles.” The British issued similar proclamations throughout their North American colonies and enticed thousands of indentured servants and slaves, known as Black Loyalists, to the British side.
Links: Britain, USA, Virginia, Black History, Slavery     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1776
The Quakers of Pennsylvania abolished slavery within the Society of Friends and then took their crusade to society at large by petitioning the state legislature to outlaw the practice.
Links: USA, Pennsylvania, Black History, Slavery     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1779 Nov 12
A group of 20 slaves who had fought in the war submitted a petition to the New Hampshire General Assembly, while the war was still being fought. Lawmakers decided the time was not right. 6 of the slaves were later freed. In 2013 a state Senate committee recommended that the state posthumously emancipate 14 of the slaves who died in bondage. On June 7, 2013, they were granted posthumous emancipation when Gov. Maggie Hassan signed a largely symbolic bill that supporters hope will encourage future generations to pursue social justice.
Links: USA, Black History, New Hampshire, Slavery     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
International Red Cross
Make a donation
1780 Mar 1
Pennsylvania became the first U.S. state to abolish slavery (for new-borns only). It was followed by Connecticut and Rhode Island in 1784, New York in 1785, and New Jersey in 1786. Massachusetts abolished slavery through a judicial decision in 1783 (see July 8 1777).
Links: USA, Pennsylvania, Black History, Slavery     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1783
Some 3,000 Blacks, who had obtained British certificates of freedom for their loyalty in the American Revolution, arrived in Nova Scotia and spent some miserable years there. In 1785 a delegation sailed to Britain where they were offered passage to Africa in return for establishing a British colony in Sierra Leone.
Links: Canada, Britain, Black History, Slavery     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1787
English ships transported some 38,000 slaves this year.
Links: Britain, Sierra Leone, Black History     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1787
Granville Sharp, English abolitionist, formed the Society for Effecting the Abolition of the Slave Trade.
Links: Britain, Black History, Slavery     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1789 May 12
In England William Wilberforce laid out his case for the abolition of slavery to the House of Commons. This speech directly led to Britain’s abolition of slavery in 1807.
Links: Britain, Black History, Slavery     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
You may send us a message, if you wish place an ad on this site.
1792
In England consumers began an organized boycott against West Indian sugar. The Anti-Saccharine Society displayed a cross-section of a slave ship with men shackled head-to-toe like sardines.
Links: Britain, Black History, Food, Slavery     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1792
The British St. George’s Bay Company transported a 2nd group of settlers to Freetown. This included 1,196 Blacks from Nova Scotia, 500 Jamaicans and dozens of rebellious slaves from other colonies.
Links: Canada, Britain, Sierra Leone, Black History, Jamaica     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1793 Feb 12
The US federal government passed its first fugitive slave law. This gave slave holders the right to reclaim their human property in free states.
Links: USA, Black History, Slavery     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1803
The Pinkster Ode was Dedicated To Carolus Africanus, Rex: Thus Rendered in English: King Charles, Capital-General and Commander in Chief of the Pinkster Boys in Albany, NY. Despite Pinkster’s Dutch origins, Africans in New York and New Jersey were so successful at incorporating their own cultures into the celebration that by the early 1800s Pinkster was actually considered an African-American holiday.
Links: USA, Poet, New York, Black History     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1803
In Virginia the Alexandria Baptist Society was formed when members split from another church. A slave was soon baptized as its first black member. In 1818 the Alfred Street Baptist Church in Alexandria was founded.
Links: USA, Virginia, Black History     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
Timelines
A text-based site.
1805
The slave ship Tryal, under Captain Don Benito Cereno, was taken over in a slave insurrection led by a man named Babo. The rebellion failed and the slaves were tried and executed in Concepcion, Chile. In 1854 Herman Melville’s authored his novella “Benito Cereno,” based on the Tryal revolt. In 2014 Greg Grandin authored “The Empire of Necessity: Slavery, Freedom and Deception in the New World,” also covering the Tryal story.
Links: Black History, Books, Slavery     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1806 Dec 6
The African Meeting House was dedicated in Boston. It was later used by Frederick Douglass and other prominent abolitionists to rail against slavery. In 1974 it was named as a National History Landmark. In 2011 a $9 million restoration was completed.
Links: USA, Massachusetts, Black History     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1807
After Britain outlawed the slave trade people called “Recaptives,” those freed from slave ships, were sent to join the settlers in Sierra Leone. The settlers formed a new tribe called the Kri and created a language called Krio.
Links: Britain, Sierra Leone, Black History, Slavery     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1807
1808
In South Carolina some 700 black people froze to death this winter in a warehouse near Charleston’s Gadsden Wharf.
Links: USA, Black History, South Carolina, Tragedy     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1811 Jan 8
Charles Deslondes led several hundred poorly armed slaves towards New Orleans in the largest slave rebellion in US history.
Links: USA, Louisiana, Black History     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
We offer additional services to help you as well including tax attorney help with tax relief issues, auto accident attorney services, and sustainable development information to research going green!
1811
1843
Some 500,000 slaves arrived at Valongo, Brazil’s main landing stage for African slaves. This port area of Rio de Janeiro was re-discovered in 2010 as the city prepared for the 2016 Olympics.
Links: Brazil, Black History, Slavery     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1813 Jul 6
Granville Sharp (b.1735), biblical scholar and English abolitionist, died.
Links: Britain, Black History, Slavery     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1816
Saartjie Baartman (26), taken from S. Africa in 1810, fell sick and died penniless and friendless in France after being exhibited as the "Hottentot Venus." Her body was dissected, her brain and genitals were bottled, and her skeleton was wired and exhibited in the Musee de l’Homme in Paris. In 1994 Nelson Mandela requested that she be returned home. In 2002 her remains were returned to S. Africa. In 2003 Barbara Chase-Ribaud authored the novel "Hottentot Venus" based on the Baartman story. In 2007 Rachel Holmes authored “African Queen: The Real Life of the Hottentot Venus.”
Links: France, South Africa, Black History, Biography     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1817 Feb 14
Frederick Douglass (d.1895), "The Great Emancipator," was born in Maryland as Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey. He was the son of a slave and a white father who bought his own freedom and published “The Narrative Life of Frederick Douglass” (1845) a memoir of his life as a slave. "The life of the nation is secure only while the nation is honest, truthful, and virtuous."
Links: USA, Maryland, Black History, Slavery     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1821
Mexico outlawed slavery.
Links: Mexico, Black History, Slavery     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
Need someone professional to write a History essay for you? - Writemyessays.com will help you.
1828
Pres. John Quincy Adams helped Abdul Rahman Ibrahima, a former prince from Timbuktu, gain freedom following 40 years of enslavement on a cotton plantation.
Links: Mali, USA, Black History, Slavery, AdamsJQ     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1829 Jul 4
In Boston, Mass., abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison (1805-1879) gave a passionate antislavery sermon at the Park Street Church and was attacked by a white supremacist mob who dragged him from the pulpit and beat him nearly to death. Garrison published the anti-slavery newspaper, the Liberator, from 1831-1865.
Links: USA, Massachusetts, Black History, Slavery     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1832
The Pittsburgh riverfront home of coal baron Abraham Hays flooded. Hays built a new mansion, which later became a stop on the Underground Railroad, harboring slaves who traveled a tunnel from the Monongahela River to the vast brick-lined basement.
Links: USA, Pennsylvania, Black History     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1833 Jun 16
Lucie (Ruthy) Blackburn (30), a fugitive slave, escaped from jail in Detroit and made her way to Canada. The next day a riot erupted, “The Blackburn Riots,” as her husband, Thornton Blackburn (21), was escorted for return to slavery. Thornton escaped to Canada to join his wife. The first extradition case between the US and Canada over the issue of fugitive slaves soon followed. Canada ruled it could not extradite people to a jurisdiction that imposed harsher penalties then they would have received for the same offense in Canada and the Blackburns remained in Ontario.
Links: Canada, USA, Black History, Michigan, Slavery, Mad Crowd     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1833 Jul 29
William Wilberforce (b.1759), English abolitionist, died. He was best known for his efforts relating to the abolition of slavery in the British Empire. A politician and philanthropist, Wilberforce was prominent from 1787 in the struggle to abolish the slave trade and slavery itself in British overseas possessions. He was an ardent and eloquent sponsor of anti-slavery legislation in the House of Commons until his retirement in 1825. Wilberforce University in Ohio, an African Methodist Episcopal Church institution (f.1856), was named for William Wilberforce. In 2008 William Hague authored “William Wilberforce: The Life of the Great Anti-Slave Trade Campaigner.” In 2010 Stephen Tomkins authored “The Clapham Sect: How Wilberforce’s Circle Transformed Britain.”
Links: Britain, Ohio, Black History, Slavery, Biography     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
International Red Cross
Make a donation
1834
Tennessee withdrew the right to vote from free blacks.
Links: USA, Tennessee, Black History     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1835 Oct 6
The people of Michigan approved a new state constitution by a vote of 6,299 to 1,359. The constitution repudiated slavery and safeguarded personal liberty.
Links: USA, Black History, Michigan, Slavery     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1836 Sep 14
Aaron Burr, the 3rd US Vice President, died. He had served as vice-president under Thomas Jefferson. Burr is alleged to have fathered a black illegitimate son named John Pierre Burr. In 1999 Roger W. Kennedy authored "Burr, Hamilton and Jefferson: A Study in Character." In 2007 Nancy Isenberg authored “Fallen Founder: The Life of Aaron Burr.”
Links: USA, Black History, Biography, JeffersonT     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1837 Mar 24
Canada gave blacks the right to vote.

Links: Canada, Black History     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1838

Maryland’s Jesuits sold 272 slaves to pay off debts for Georgetown Univ. located in Washington DC. In 2016 the school introduced a set of measures that included an initiative offering preferential admission status to descendants of those held in slavery by the university.

Links: USA, Maryland, Black History, DC, Slavery     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
You may send us a message, if you wish place an ad on this site.
1839
Iowa’s Supreme Court ruled against slavery.
Links: USA, Black History, Iowa, Slavery     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1840
The US state of Georgia by this time had over 280,000 slaves with many working as field hands. By the start of Civil War slaves made up over 40% of the state’s population.
Links: GeorgiaUS, USA, Black History, Slavery     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1841 Apr 3
From Nassau, Bahamas, a British magistrate wrote that 193 shipwrecked African slaves from the ship Trouvadore were found naked on the shores of the East Caicos Island. The slaves were then quarantined in a jail and given food and clothing. The accident set free the slaves who became ancestors of many later residents of the islands. In 2004 the wreck was found and in 2008 marine archaeologists identified it as the remains of the slave ship.
Links: Bahamas, Britain, Black History, Turks and Caicos, Slavery     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1841 Nov
Freed African survivors of the slave ship Amistad returned to Sierra Leone, Africa. Abolitionists had raised money to help the freed slaves of the Amistad return home. When Cinque, the leader of the revolt, reached home, he found that his family had been captured and sold into slavery.
Links: Sierra Leone, Black History, Slavery     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1841
William A. Leidesdorff, originally from the Virgin Islands, arrived in San Francisco. He became a prominent businessman, built the city’s first hotel, became a member of the first SF City Council and served as the city’s first treasurer.
Links: USA, Black History, SF     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
Timelines
A text-based site.
1841
Dentist Joseph Wilson authored “Sketches of the Higher Classes of Coloured Society in Philadelphia.”
Links: USA, Pennsylvania, Black History, Books     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1843
Norbert Rillieux (1806-1894) received US patent # 3,237 for a double-effect evaporator, while overseeing the building of the device for plantation owner Theodore Packwood.
Links: USA, Black History, Inventor     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1845
Frederick Douglas, African-American statesman, traveled to Ireland where he received a hero’s welcome. Irish nationalist Daniel O’Connell saw common cause between Ireland’s quest for self-rule and the plight of American slaves.
Links: USA, Ireland, Black History     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1845
Frederick Douglass, African-American statesman, published “The Narrative Life of Frederick Douglass.” He then traveled to Ireland where he received a hero’s welcome. Irish nationalist Daniel O’Connell saw common cause between Ireland’s quest for self-rule and the plight of American slaves. British admirers raised money to buy his freedom and he was officially manumitted after Hugh Auld, his alleged owner, received a payment of $711.66.
Links: Ireland, Black History, Biology, Books, Slavery     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1846 Dec 10
Norbert Rillieux (1806-1894), African-American engineer, received a patent for the Rillieux Process for refining sugar. He won several patents for a way to refine sugar in a process that later came to be called multiple-effect distillation.
Links: USA, Black History, Inventor     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
We offer additional services to help you as well including tax attorney help with tax relief issues, auto accident attorney services, and sustainable development information to research going green!
1848 Apr 27
Slave trade was abolished in the French colonies.
Links: France, Black History, Slavery     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1849 Feb
Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881), Scottish essayist, anonymously authored the article: "Occasional Discourse on the Negro Question," in which he 1st used the phrase "the dismal science" to describe political economics: It is “not a gay science… no, a dreary, desolate, and indeed quite abject and distressing one; what we might call, by way of eminence, the dismal science." Carlyle himself argued in this essay for the reintroduction of slavery into the West Indies. In 2001 David M. Levy authored "How the Dismal Science Got Its Name."
Links: Scotland, Writer, Black History, Economics, Slavery     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1849 Nov 13
Voters approved the California state constitution 12,061 to 811. The original Constitution was drafted and signed on 19 hand-written pages of an animal-skin document. At the constitutional convention 48 delegates met in San Jose. This was criticized by the state’s first daily newspaper, the Alta California, as a location among the coyotes. The "Legislature of a thousand drinks" established a code of laws and a judicial system, elected 2 senators and voted to relocate to Vallejo. The constitution abolished slavery but barred blacks from voting, holding public office and testifying in court against whites. John Bidwell was elected to the state Senate.
Links: USA, California, Black History, Slavery     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1849 Dec 20
Peter Burnett (1807-1895), the 1st governor of California, gave his inaugural address. Burnett was elected governor of California before it had even become a state. He abruptly resigned from office in 1851. Burnett, who wrote a book about his passionate conversion to Catholicism, is honored with a memorial in the church at Mission Santa Clara. While in office Burnett, a native of Tennessee, proposed that blacks, whether slave or free, be banned from the state by statute. He also saw the necessity for exterminating the state’s Indians if California were to grow.
Links: USA, California, Black History     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1849
In Canada Josiah Henson (b.1789), former Maryland slave, authored his autobiography. It became the model for Harriet Beecher Stowe’s 1852 novel “Uncle Tom’s Cabin.”
Links: Canada, USA, Writer, Maryland, Black History     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
Need someone professional to write a History essay for you? - Writemyessays.com will help you.

Next     Prev
Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...



Go to top