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1873
San Francisco’s first cable car hit the tracks starting at Clay and Jones streets on Nob Hill.
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1873
Charles Stoddard (1843-1909), SF-based poet, editor and novelist, authored “South Sea Idyls,” a collection of his travel tales.
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1873
In San Francisco the Toland Medical college was gifted to the Univ. of California system.
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1874
In San Francisco Italians from Genoa built the Colombo Market two blocks east of a former location on Samsome St. between Clay and Washington. By 2015 only the brick archway survived in Sidney Walton Square Park on Front St. between Jackson and Pacific.
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1875 Apr 2
In San Francisco a painting of a dead maiden titled “Elaine” by Toby Rosenthal (1848-1917), was discovered stolen from the Snow & May art gallery on Kearny St. The Prussia-born artist had been raised in San Francisco before he went to study art in Germany. On April 4 police arrested William Donohue and three cronies and recovered the painting at a shanty on Langton St.
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1875 Oct 30
San Francisco Mayor James Otis (b.1826) died of diphtheria.
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1875 Nov 16
Jasper O’Farrell (b.1817), the first surveyor for San Francisco and architect of its streets, died after taking a drink at a tavern on Hardie Place at Kearny.
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1875
A Marine Hospital was built in the Presidio area of San Francisco. An adjacent cemetery operated at the site from about 1981 to 1915. In 1912 US marine hospitals became Public Health Service hospitals. A new structure was completed in 1932. In 1952 the hospital was expanded and Landfill 8 covered the graves, which were never moved. In 1981 the hospital was decommissioned and in 2010 reopened as 154 luxury apartments. Landfill 8 was capped with sand and underwent restoration to resemble its original, pre-European look.
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1875
San Francisco’s Lowell High School, then called the Union Grammar School, moved within San Francisco to Sutter Street between Gough and Octavia.
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1875
In San Francisco the Simon Brothers opened a grocery store at 2829 California Street. In 1967 it was gutted by a fire.
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1876 Jan 12
Jack London (d.1916), American writer and adventurer, was born in SF at 3rd and Brannon. The original home burned down in the 1906 fire. He is best known for his dog novels "The Call of the Wild" and “White Fang.”
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1876 Jul 4
Fr. Joseph Neri, SJ, introduced electric lights on Market Street in SF.
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1876
Oil was struck in a well near what later became Santa Clarita, California. It was sold to the Pacific Coast Oil Co. of San Francisco in 1879, which eventurally became Chevron.
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1876
1880
Fr. John Pinasco, SJ, served as the 7th president of San Francisco’s St. Ignatius College.
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1876
California approved harbor lines for San Francisco. Construction of a seawall began in 1878.
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1877 Sep 30
Harry Meiggs (b.1811), American businessman and railroad magnate in Chile and Peru, died virtually penniless in Peru. Before his death Meiggs made restitution to his creditors in San Francisco. In 1874 the California legislature passed Senate Bill 183 dismissing any previous indictment against him.
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1877 Oct 29
In San Francisco the Jesuits paid $200,000 for lot 74 of the Western Addition, a block of land bordered by Van Ness, Hayes, Franklin and Grove Streets. Construction of a new church, campus and residence buildings lasted from 1878-1880 and cost $323,763.
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1877
Isaac Magnin and his wife Mary Ann Cohen Magnin founded their first I. Magnin store in SF. The original store was located on Market street. It moved to Grant Avenue after the 1906 earthquake and in 1948 opened at Geary and Stockton in the “Marble Lady,” designed by Timothy Pflueger. It merged with Bullocks in 1944 and became a division of Federated Department Stores in 1964. The store closed Jan 15, 1995.
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1877
Almost one-fourth of the California labor force was unemployed. Anti-Chinese feelings in SF resulted in several killings. The Sand Lot riots began under the leadership of Denis Kearney, who organized mobs that attacked the Chinese. The Chronicle newspaper called him “a political mad dog.” These riots followed similar mob attacks in the Eastern States.
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1877
San Francisco’s Bayview neighborhood was dubbed “Butchertown” as 18 slaughterhouses set up shop on the waterfront.
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1877
San Francisco’s 2nd cable car line, the Sutter Street Railroad, ran out Sutter from Market and Sansome to its power house at Larkin and Bush.
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1878 Jan 25
Off of San Francisco the 3-masted clipper ship King Philip, built in Maine in 1856, was towed by a tug through the Golden Gate and laid anchor to allow the tug to assist a nearby vessel. The anchor failed and the King Philip drifted onto sand at Ocean Beach, where it foundered. Remnants of the ship appeared in 1980 and again in 2007.
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1878
Ephraim Burr (1809-1894), former mayor of SF (1856-1859), built an Italianate house at 1772 Vallejo St.
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1878
Austin and R.W. Hills founded Hills Bros. Coffee in SF. [see 1876]
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1878
The Mill Building at 720 York St., designed by Laver & Curlett, was built. It was restored in 1998.
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1879 Aug 22
Robert B. Woodward (1824), San Francisco entrepreneur, died in Napa, Ca. His SF amusement park began to decline and closed in 1891.
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1879 Sep 10
Pacific Coast Oil Co. was founded in San Francisco by Lloyd Tevis, George Loomis and Charles Felton. In 1906 it became Standard Oil Co. (California). In 1926 it became Standard Oil Co. of California (Socal). In 1984 it became Chevron Corp. In 2001 it became ChevronTexaco. In 2005 it was renamed Chevron Corp.
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1879 Oct 24
In San Francisco the 9-day “Author’s Carnival” opened as a fundraiser for six charities. Six thousand people attended each night.
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1880 Jan 8
San Francisco’s Emperor Norton died on the corner of California and Grant. He had an elaborate funeral sponsored by the Pacific Union Club at a cost of $10,000. His remains were later moved from the Masonic Cemetery to Woodlawn Cemetery with a marble tombstone inscribed: Norton I...Emperor of the United States and Protector of Mexico. Joshua A. Norton 1815-1880. Dr. Robert Burns Aird (d.2000) later composed a musical based on Norton's life. The organization E Clampus Vitus later proceeded to hold an annual memorial services at his Colma grave site.
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1880 Jan 28
Henry Casebolt, San Francisco inventor of the cable car grip, sold his interest in the Sutter Street Railway.
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1880 Feb 1
In San Francisco the buildings of the new St. Ignatius campus at Van Ness and Hayes were dedicated. Archbishop Alemany and bishop James A. Healy presided over the dedication of the new church oh Hayes St.
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1880 Jul 2
In San Francisco St. Ignatius College opened for classes at its new campus at Van Ness and Hayes.
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1880 Oct 28
San Francisco held a referendum on whether ”The Awakening” by French artist Gabriel Guay (1848-1923) should be open for public view. An exhibit of a nude painting at the 15th Mechanic’s Fair triggered the referendum and 12,808 people bought tickets to the fair on the day of the vote, which passed in favor in a landslide.
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1880
US Pres. Rutherford Hayes lunched at the Cliff House in SF.
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1880
1889
The San Francisco Belt Line began operating during this period to move freight from ships docked at the port for trans-shipment by rail.
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1880
1882
Fr. Robert E. Kenna, SJ, (1844-1912) served as the 8th president of San Francisco’s St. Ignatius College.
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1880
In San Francisco Ned Greenway (1851-1926) founded the Bachelor’s Cotillion Club and began hosting monthly cotillions to introduce young ladies to society. The monthly gatherings continued to 1914.
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1881
“What Mrs. Fisher Knows About Southern Cooking” by Abby Fisher was published by the San Francisco Women’s Co-operative Printing Office.
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1881
Joseph Brandenstein opened a coffee company in SF, naming it after his son Michael J. Brandenstein and Co. The name was later shortened to MJB Inc.
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1881
Adolph Sutro bought most of San Francisco’s western headlands. Sutro acquired 2200 acres of land around the Cliff House which had become a disreputable entertainment hall. Sutro bought the Cliff House and the adjacent 80 acres to develop a seaside attraction that included the Sutro Baths and the Sutro Conservatory.
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1883 Dec
In San Francisco Cornelius Mooney, Denis Kearney and other squatters began selling coffee, doughnuts and whiskey to the new day trippers visiting Ocean Beach and the Cliff House following the opening of the Park and Ocean Railroad line to the area. The new shantytown became known as Mooneysville.
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1883
In San Francisco Army Major W.A. Jones created a plan to transform the Presidio into a forested park-like reserve. In 1886 the Army began planting blue gum eucalyptus to serve as a windbreak on the ridges of the Presidio.
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1883
Fr. Joseph Sasia, SJ (1843-1928) took over as president of St. Ignatius College in San Francisco.
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1883
In San Francisco Commercial High School opened as the business department of Boys High School, which eventually became Lowell. It then split from Lowell, relocated twice and settled on Market Street just in time to go up in flames in the 1906 earthquake.
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1883
San Francisco’s Park and Ocean Railroad began carrying passengers from Haight and Stanyon out H Street (later Lincoln Way) to 49th Ave. (later la Playa), and then north to the Cliff House. The round trip cost 20 cents. A clerk’s average salary at this time was $12 per week.
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1884 Jan 27
The San Francisco Board of Supervisors called for the removal of the “Ocean Beach nuisance,” referring to the recently erected shantytown named Mooneysville.
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1884 Jan 31
In San Francisco men under city Park Commissioner Frank Pixley, reinforced by police, demolished the Mooneysville shantytown at Ocean Beach.
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1884 Feb 11
In San Francisco a burlesque called “Mooneysville, or the Fate of a Seal,” written by humorist Charley Reed, opened at the Standard theater.
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1884 Sep
In San Francisco Mamie Tape (8), a Chinese-American girl, was denied admittance to public school.
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1884
In SF, Ca., Adolph Spreckels, son of sugar-baron Claus Spreckels, attempted to kill Michael de Young due to a Chronicle story that accused his father of swindling shareholders. Spreckles was acquitted.
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1884
In SF Sts. Peter and Paul Church was built in North Beach at the corner of Grant and Filbert. It was destroyed in the 1906 earthquake and rebuilt in 1924 on Washington Square.
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1884
In San Francisco Central Park opened at 8th and Market. It featured a new ball park as the popularity of baseball grew.
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1884
In San Francisco the University Mound Ladies Home was built at 350 University St. as a comfortable home for elderly women of modest means.
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1885 Jan
The San Francisco Superior Court ruled that Mamie Tape’s 1884 exclusion from public school violated both the 1880 California school law and the 14th Amendment to the US Constitution. School Superintendent Andrew Jackson Moulder followed up by pushing through a state bill authorizing separate schools for “children of Chinese and Mongolian descent.”
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1885 Feb
Duncan C. Ross of Scotland arrived in San Francisco and introduced a broadsword jousting competition. Some 1,800 people attended the event at the new baseball grounds at Eight and Market. The successful contest led him to stage a regular event for a year on top of Telegraph Hill.
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1885 Nov 1
In San Francisco Cecelia Bowers (29), the wife of Dr. J. Milton Bowers (45), died following a two-month-long illness. An autopsy revealed that she had died of phosphorous poisoning. Dr. Bowers was later found guilty of first-degree murder and sentenced to hang. In 1887 the body of Henry Benhayon, the brother of Cecilia, was found murdered at a boarding house at 22 Geary St. He left three letters confessing to the murder of his sister. Thomas Dimmig (33), the husband of a staunch supporter of Dr. Bowers was charged with killing Benhayon. Dimmig was later acquitted and the case against Dr. Bowers (d.1904) was dismissed.
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1885
Jules Harder, 1st chef of the SF Palace Hotel, authored “The Physiology of Taste: Harder’s Book of Practical American Cookery.”
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1885
Union Iron Works launched its first ship, the coal carrier Arago, from Pier 70 in SF.
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1885
Charles Rollo Peters painted “Italian Fisherman’s Wharf,” a scene of the congested SF harbor.
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1885
In San Francisco a 4-level Victorian was built at 3086 Washington St. In 2009 the 4,851 square-foot house listed for $6.45 million following renovations.
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