Home
Subject list

SF

Next     Prev
Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 ...

1894
In San Francisco the Woodward’s Gardens amusement park, opened in 1866, closed. Many of its curiosities were moved to Sutro Baths, which opened in 1896.
Links: USA, SF     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1894
In San Francisco the 30-foot-tall Pioneer Monument was erected at Hyde and Grove streets outside the City Hall. The historic tableau of life in early California was funded by the estate of financier James Lick and made by sculptor Frank Happersberger. The monument survived the 1906 earthquake and was moved a block up on Hyde in the 1990s to make room for the new SF Main Library. A plaque was added in 1996 to explain its historical context.
Links: USA, California, SF     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1895 Apr 10
The San Francisco Chronicle reported that Blanche Dumont (21), a student living in the Mission District, had disappeared a week earlier. She had last been seen with Theodore Durrant (23), a medical student who lived on Fair Oaks St.
Links: USA, SF, Murder     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1895 Apr 13
In San Francisco a woman at the Emmanuel Baptist Church, on Bartlett St. between 22nd and 23rd, discovered the stabbed and raped body of Minnie Williams (21). Minnie was last seen with medical student Theodore Durrant the night before. Police then found the body of Blanche Dumont in the church belfry. Investigators said she had been strangled 10 days earlier. Durrant was later convicted and hanged at San Quentin in 1898. The church was demolished in 1915.
Links: USA, SF, Murder, Rape     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1895 Nov 2
In San Francisco the Chutes amusement park first opened on Haight Street, featuring the shoot-the-chutes water slide. It relocated to Fulton Street and 10th Avenue in 1902 and was extremely popular right after the 1906 earthquake and fire, because it was the only amusement park and theater that survived. In the post-quake years, Fillmore Street became the entertainment area, with numerous nickelodeons and other attractions. The Chutes on Fulton Street closed after New Year’s Eve, 1908, and reopened on Fillmore and Turk Streets on July 14, 1909, but without the shoot-the-chutes. The New Chutes offered a host of other amusement attractions and soon built a first class vaudeville Theater, where in 1910, Sophie Tucker revived her career after being black-balled by Flo Ziegfeld back in New York. The New Chutes would burn on the Memorial Day weekend of the opening of the Summer season, on May 29, 1911, the same weekend that Dreamland at Coney Island would be destroyed on the other side of the continent. The theater was saved, but the entire wooden Chutes amusement park was destroyed and never reopened.
Links: USA, SF     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
International Red Cross
Make a donation
1895 Nov 9
In San Francisco some 20 police officers marched down Sixth Street to the shantytown known as Dumpville. All the crude dwelling were raised and all that was combustible was burned.
Links: USA, SF     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1895
1942
The Hagiwara Family operated the Japanese Tea Garden in Golden Gate Park. In 1914 Makoto Hagiwara introduced the fortune cookie.
Links: SF, Food, Tea     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1895
William Randolph Hearst (1863-1951) bought the New York Morning Journal for $180,000 and moved from SF to NYC. He soon renamed it the New York Journal. In 2008 Kenneth Whyte authored “The Uncrowned King: The Sensational Rise of William Randolph Hearst,” an account of Heart’s first three years in NYC.
Links: USA, NYC, SF, Journalism     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1895
Charlie Fey, a German immigrant, sold the first Liberty Bell nickel slot machine, to a San Francisco saloon keeper.
Links: Money, Technology, SF     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1895
San Francisco’s Carville community began about this time on the dunes south of GG Park as Col. Dailey rented an abandoned horse car from Adolph Sutro and turned it into a coffee shop called the Annex. The Market St. Railway Co. began offering horse-drawn trolleys for $20 with seats and $10 without seats. These formed the framework for many beachside houses and by 1908 Carville’s population was estimated at 2,000. In 1913 the Oceanside Improvement Club ceremonially set fire to four cars. By the 1920s Carville was mostly gone.
Links: USA, SF     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
You may send us a message, if you wish place an ad on this site.
1895
A San Francisco judge issued an injunction against quarrymen George and Harry Gray after a shoemaker’s house was blasted off its foundation at Union St and Calhoun. The Grays shifted operations to a quarry near 26th and Douglass streets in Noe Valley.
Links: USA, SF, Real Estate     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1895
In San Francisco a 3-story, Queen Anne style home was built at 900 Guerrero St. It was designed by Charles Havens for John Daly, the dairy farmer after whom Daly City is named.
Links: USA, SF, Daly City     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1895
In San Francisco the Haight Street Grounds, used for nine seasons of baseball and football, was demolished and subdivided into 64 buildable lots.
Links: USA, SF, Baseball     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1896 Jul 25
An estimated 5,000 cyclists gathered in SF to demonstrate for better roads. The bicycle parade ended in a riot with bonfires in front of City Hall.
Links: USA, Bicycle, SF, Mad Crowd     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1896
In San Francisco Fr. John P. Frieden, SJ (1844-1911) succeeded Fr. Allan as president of St. Ignatius College. Frieden continued for the next 12 years.
Links: USA, SF, Education     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
Timelines
A text-based site.
1896
Henry Doelger (d.1978), SF and Daly City home builder, was born in SF.
Links: USA, SF, Real Estate, Daly City     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1896
The Molinari family began making air dried salami in San Francisco’s North Beach.
Links: USA, SF, Food     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1896
San Francisco authorities cleaned up Morton Street, a well-known brothel alley. It was renamed Union Square Avenue in 1899 and renamed Manila Avenue in 1909. In 1922 it became Maiden’s Lane.
Links: USA, SF, Sex     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1897 Jan 23
In San Francisco Fong Ching (aka Fung Jing Toy), was killed by two gunmen at the Wong Lung barbershop at 817 Washington St. Nobody was ever convicted. “Little Pete” (b.1864) was known as the king of Chinatown and had led the Sam Yup Tong. He was rumored to have killed 50 men and spent 5 years at Folsom Prison.
Links: USA, SF, Murder     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1897 Mar 18
Fr. Anthony Maraschi (b.1820), founder of the University of San Francisco and Saint Ignatius College Preparatory as well as the first pastor of Saint Ignatius Church in San Francisco, California., died.
Links: USA, SF, Education     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
We offer additional services to help you as well including tax attorney help with tax relief issues, auto accident attorney services, and sustainable development information to research going green!
1897
In San Francisco the 4-unit building at 425-431 Buchanan St., designed by William T. Cummins, was built. The roofline was enhanced by 4 round towers.
Links: USA, SF, Architect     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1897
In San Francisco the cornerstone of the Sacred Heart Catholic Church was laid. It was built in the Lombardi style on Fillmore Street. In 1910 three altars of Carrera marble, designed by Attilio Moretti, were installed. In 2004 plans were made to close it due to $8 million in costs for repairs from the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. In 2014 it opened up for disco roller skating.
Links: USA, SF, Architect     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1897
1901
James D. Phelan (d.1930) served as mayor of SF.
Links: USA, SF     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1898 Aug 8
Adolph Sutro (b.1830), former mayor of SF, died. He had acquired a 100,000 volume private library, most of which was destroyed in the 1906 earthquake. He served as the 24th mayor of SF (1895-1897).
Links: USA, SF     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1898
In San Francisco W.A. Merralls (d.1914), an eccentric British-born machine inventor, built a structure at 236 Monterey Blvd. that became known as the Sunnyside Conservatory. He filled the building with plants and artwork and used it as a private retreat. The building was saved from demolition and purchased by the city in 1980. In 1999 community members formed the Friends of Sunnyside Conservatory and planned its restoration. In 2009 a $4.2 million restoration of the property was completed and opened to the public on Dec 5.
Links: USA, SF, Real Estate     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
Need someone professional to write a History essay for you? - Writemyessays.com will help you.
1898
In San Francisco Central Tower at 703 market St. was built by Claus Sprechels for the Call newspaper. It was designed by the Reid Brothers and Albert Roller and survived the 1906 earthquake. Its 6 stories of cupolas were removed as part of a 1938 renovation that left it with 21 stories.
Links: USA, SF, Architect     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1898
In SF the Ferry Building at the foot of Market St. was dedicated. It was designed by local San Francisco architect A. Page Brown, replacing its wooden predecessor. The clock on the building was silent until Dec, 1918. The original design was based on the Giralda in Seville. The design was altered to differentiate it from the Madison Square Garden Tower built in 1984.
Links: USA, SF, Architect     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1898
In San Francisco the 315-foot Call Building was completed at 703 Market St.
Links: USA, SF     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1898
A coin operated machine called Liberty Bell was invented in San Francisco. It was the first automatic payout machine. It established the standard for millions of slot machines made during the early 20th century.
Links: USA, Money, SF, Games     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1899 Oct
In San Francisco flammable eucalyptus fueled a 60-acre fire in Adolf Sutro’s forest, 10 years after it was planted.
Links: USA, SF, Fire     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
International Red Cross
Make a donation
1899
The Matson shipping line began using 266-foot square-rigger Falls of Clyde, built in Glasgow, Scotland, in 1878, to haul molasses to California and return back to Hawaii with kerosene. This continued until 1922 when the ship was demasted and sent to Alaska, where it became a floating fuel dock. In 1963 enthusiasts towed the ship back to Hawaii, where it later came under the ownership of the Bishop Museum. In 2008 new owners hoped to save an renovate the ship.
Links: USA, SF, Alaska, Ship, Hawaii     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1900 Jan 2
The cargo steamship Australia arrived in San Francisco at the end of a voyage from Hawaii. Plague was known to have already hit Honolulu and rats aboard the ship carried the disease. Wong Chut King became the city’s first victim when he was found dead at the Globe Hotel at Jackson and DuPont (later Grant Ave.). A short term rope quarantine was created around the 6-by-2 block area of Chinatown.
Links: USA, Microbiology, SF, Hawaii     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1900 May 30
It was reported that 9 deaths in Chinatown were caused by Bubonic plague, the Yersinia pestis bacterium, and that 159 policemen had set up a quarantine. A barbed wire blockade of the quarter led to riots. In 2003 Marilyn Chase authored "The Barbary Plague: The Black Death in Victorian San Francisco."
Links: USA, Microbiology, SF     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1900 Sep
The Spreckels Temple of Music was dedicated in San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park. Adolph B. Spreckels convinced his father, sugar king Claus Spreckels, to contribute $60,000 to transform the Grand Court of the 1884 fair into a music concourse. The bandshell, damaged by the 1989 earthquake, was put up for a $2 million restoration in 1991 and set to reopen in 1993.
Links: USA, SF     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1900
In SF the Sisters of the Holy Family founded the Holy Family Day Home, an educational facility for children. Their facility at 16th and Dolores was damaged in the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. A new structure was to be completed in 2007.
Links: SF     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
You may send us a message, if you wish place an ad on this site.
1900
The San Francisco Board of Supervisors expanded again to 18 members.
Links: USA, SF     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1900
San Francisco Mayor James Phelan spoke against Japanese immigration in the state’s first large-scale public protest against the Japanese.
Links: USA, Japan, SF     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1900
In San Francisco a two storey home was built at 145 Buena Vista Ave. East. In 2015 the upper condo 3-bedroom unit was listed for $2.75 million.
Links: USA, SF, Real Estate     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1900
1903
San Francisco’s Union Square was redesigned with the Dewey Memorial at its center. It was designed by sculptor Robert J. Aitken and architect Newton J. Tharp. [see May 14, 1903]
Links: USA, SF     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1901 Jan
In San Francisco 163 men convened at Pioneer Hall and launched what would become the California Labor Federation.
Links: USA, Labor, SF     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
Timelines
A text-based site.
1901 Feb 21
The steamer City of Rio de Janeiro piled up on rocks at Fort Point at the bay entrance of San Francisco. Only 82 of some 210 people were rescued, mostly by Italian fishing boats. Many of the dead were Chinese immigrants. The ship was being guided by bar pilot Frederick W. Jordan when it hit submerged rock near Lime Point in 320 feet of water. The remains of the ship were reportedly discovered in 1987 and a consortium hoped to salvage an alleged secret cargo of $2 million in silver bars. The wreck of the ship has never since been located. In November, 2014, a remote submersible discovered the remains of the ship in 287 feet of water.
Links: USA, SF, Tragedy, Ship     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1901 Nov
Eugene Schmitz, a handsome bandleader, was elected mayor. Schmitz and Abe Ruef, a lawyer, had formed the Union Labor Party and after a while began running a political machine that took payoffs for everything connected with the city.
Links: USA, Labor, SF, Corruption     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1901
In San Francisco a great teamsters and waterfront strike culminated years of tension between unions and employers over the issue of closed-shop. 15,000 strikers paralyzed the city, but lost the strike after mayor James Phelan provided strike breakers with police protection. This led attorney Abe Ruef and Eugene Schmitz, head of the Musician’s Union, to form the Union Labor Party.
Links: USA, Labor, SF     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1901
SF Mayor James D. Phelan, as a private citizen, filed for water rights in Yosemite’s Hetch Hetchy Valley and at nearby Lake Eleanor.
Links: USA, California, SF     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1902
In SF the 12-story building at One Kearny was built in a French Renaissance style. It was designed by William Curlett. In 1964 an addition, designed by Charles Moore, included new circulation systems and bathrooms. In 2009 a 10-story addition was completed on its other side.
Links: USA, SF, Architect     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
We offer additional services to help you as well including tax attorney help with tax relief issues, auto accident attorney services, and sustainable development information to research going green!
1902
In San Francisco the Odd Fellows Cemetery in the Lone mountain area closed down. In the 1930s some remains from there were exhumed and reburied at Greenlawn Memorial Park in Colma.
Links: USA, SF     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1903 Feb 3
Edward F. Adams, editorial writer for the SF Chronicle, founded the SF Commonwealth Club as an open forum for the discussion of disputed questions.
Links: USA, SF     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1903 May 14
The Dewey Memorial in Union Square, San Francisco, was dedicated by Pres. Theodore Roosevelt. Robert Aitken sculpted the 12-foot statue of Victory that stood atop an 83-foot column. Alma de Bretteville, later Alma Spreckels, had posed as the model. Sugar magnate Adolph Spreckels was so taken with the model that he married her.
Links: USA, SF, RooseveltT     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1903 Jun 11
The San Francisco Board of Supervisors enacted Section 538 of the Police Code forbidding youngsters under 21 from congregating in groups between 8 p.m. and daylight the following morning. On Nov 13, 1962, Municipal Judge Leland Lazarus ruled Section 538 unconstitutional.
Links: USA, SF     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1903 Jul 25
In San Francisco Layman’s Folly, the German-style castle built on Telegraph Hill in 1883 by entrepreneur Frederick Layman, was destroyed by fire.
Links: USA, SF, Fire     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
Need someone professional to write a History essay for you? - Writemyessays.com will help you.
1903 Oct 18
In San Francisco Dr. August Greth flew his 80-foot-long American Eagle airship over the city. Its engine stalled and the wind carried it over the bay where it plummeted into the water. He and his assistant were recovered by soldiers from Fort Point.
Links: USA, Aviation, SF     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1903 Nov 25
In San Francisco Alexander Garnett shot and killed Major J.W. McClung at the Palace Hotel apartment of Mrs. Lillian Hitchcock Coit. Coit soon left the city and spent the next 6 years in Paris. Garnett was convicted and sentenced to 15 years at San Quentin, but only began serving time in 1909 following an appeal and restoration of records due to the 1906 fire.
Links: USA, SF, Murder     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1903
In San Francisco the 3-story home at 59 Cabrillo St. was built by H.R. Pinnery. Its style was a sort of Queen Anne / Colonial Revival.
Links: SF, Real Estate     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1903
Some Noe Valley homes of San Francisco were built astride the former Precita Creek. The stream ran along the foot of Bernal Heights. Precita means “condemned to hell” in Spanish.
Links: USA, SF     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1903
Dr. Rupert Blue reported that the bubonic plague epidemic had been confined to the 24 blocks of San Francisco’s Chinatown and that the district was now plague-free and plague-proof. Blue had replaced Joseph Kinyoun as the federal official charged with fighting the epidemic.
Links: USA, Microbiology, SF     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
International Red Cross
Make a donation
1903
In San Francisco the 17-story Merchants Exchange Building at 465 California St. was designed by Willis Polk and the D.H. Burnham architectural firm.
Links: USA, SF, Architect     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1904 Jan 4
Mary Ellen Pleasant (89), abolitionist and SF businesswoman, died after years of work on the Underground Railroad and in civil rights. She was buried in Napa, Ca. Her monument reads “Mother of Civil Rights in California.” She had built a mansion at 1661 Octavia, where Gov. elect Newton Booth boarded. In 1902 Pleasant authored her autobiography.
Links: USA, Black History, SF     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1904 Mar 1
1904 Mar 31
SF experienced a record 23 days of rain for this month. The record was broken March 30, 2006, as rainfall hit a 24th day.
Links: USA, SF, WeatherUS     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1904 Jun 30
The San Francisco Chronicle reported that a property on Calhoun St. belonging to a Mrs. Burdett had been destroyed by blasting by quarrymen George and Harry Gray. Their blasting had erased a stretch of Calhoun St. and left a sheer precipice 125 feet high.
Links: USA, SF, Real Estate     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1904
In San Francisco a 5-story building was completed for the Folger Coffee Co. at 101 Howard St. It survived the 1906 earthquake due to wooden piles driven 40 feet into the bay fill below.
Links: USA, SF, Coffee     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
You may send us a message, if you wish place an ad on this site.

Next     Prev
Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 ...



Go to top