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1888
Chicago’s 11-story Rookery building at 209 S. La Salle St. was built.
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1888
In Massachusetts the Searles Castle was built in Great Barrington on commission by Mary Hopkins (d.1891), the widow of railroad tycoon Mark Hopkins. Its seven turrets and blue dolomite exterior created a 60,000-square-foot fortress at the end of Main Street. Mary Hopkins hired noted interior decorator Edward Searles for the project, and the two married a year before it was finished. In 2007 it sold for $15 million.
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1888
In San Francisco a 2-story Victorian home at 50 Liberty St., designed by Absalom J. Barnett, was completed.
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1890 Jun 22
The SF Chronicle trumpeted its new 10-story building at Kearny and Market, the first steel-framed building in the West. It was designed by Burnham & Root of Chicago. In 1924 the Chronicle moved to its new building at Fifth and Mission. In 1962-1963 Home Mutual Savings and Loan draped the De Young Building at 690 Market in metal. In 2004 planned renovations included conversion to residential and hotel use.
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1891 Jan 11
Georges-Eugene Haussmann (b.1809), French town planner, died. He designed modern-day Paris.
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1891
Madison Square Garden opened to the public. At the request of architect Stanford White, Augustus Saint-Gaudens (1848-1907) created a revolving finial to surmount the tower of White's Madison Square Garden. The 18-foot-high Diana was disproportionately large for White's tower and that the figure could not revolve in the wind, as intended, because it was too heavy.
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1895
Chicago’s Marquette Building at 140 Dearborn St. was built.
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1895
Chicago’s 14-story Reliance Building at 32 N. State St. was built.
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1897
In San Francisco the 4-unit building at 425-431 Buchanan St., designed by William T. Cummins, was built. The roofline was enhanced by 4 round towers.
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1897
In San Francisco the cornerstone of the Sacred Heart Catholic Church was laid. It was built in the Lombardi style on Fillmore Street. In 1910 three altars of Carrera marble, designed by Attilio Moretti, were installed. In 2004 plans were made to close it due to $8 million in costs for repairs from the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. In 2014 it opened up for disco roller skating.
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1898
In San Francisco Central Tower at 703 market St. was built by Claus Sprechels for the Call newspaper. It was designed by the Reid Brothers and Albert Roller and survived the 1906 earthquake. Its 6 stories of cupolas were removed as part of a 1938 renovation that left it with 21 stories.
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1898
In SF the Ferry Building at the foot of Market St. was dedicated. It was designed by local San Francisco architect A. Page Brown, replacing its wooden predecessor. The clock on the building was silent until Dec, 1918. The original design was based on the Giralda in Seville. The design was altered to differentiate it from the Madison Square Garden Tower built in 1984.
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1900
In Philadelphia, Pa., the 8-million, 110-room Lynnewood Hall, home to the uber-wealthy Widener family, was completed. It came to be called "the last of the American Versailles." French landscape architect Jacques Greber designed the formal French gardens, which were graced by his brother Henri-Louis Greber's fountain of bronze and marble statuary. P.A.B. Widener's son, Joseph, died there in 1943 and the younger generation deemed the property too large to maintain. Much of the acreage was sold to developers and the opulent furnishings were auctioned. In 1952, the Rev. Carl McIntire of Collingswood, N.J., a controversial fundamentalist preacher, bought the property for $190,000 and established a Christian seminary. In 1993 New York physician Richard Sei-Oung Yoon, a former student of McIntire and one-time chancellor of the cash-strapped seminary, bought its mortgage for $1.6 million with plans of establishing his own church there.
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1902
In SF the 12-story building at One Kearny was built in a French Renaissance style. It was designed by William Curlett. In 1964 an addition, designed by Charles Moore, included new circulation systems and bathrooms. In 2009 a 10-story addition was completed on its other side.
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1904
In San Francisco the St. Francis Hotel overlooking Union Square was built based on an H-shaped design plan by Bliss and Faville. A third wing was soon added and a 4th wing came in 1913. In 1972 a multi-story modern tower, designed by William L. Pereira Assoc., was added.
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1904
Julia Morgan (1872-1957) became the first woman to receive a California architectural license.In 2014 she became the first woman to receive the annual Gold Medal awarded by the American Institute of Architects.
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1905
In SF a building at 700 Montgomery St. was constructed in late classical style for the Columbus Savings Bank. It survived the 1906 earthquake.
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1905
In SF a 16,000 square-foot, Italianate-style mansion was built at 2820 Scott St. In 1915 it was elegantly embellished for a visit by Marie, the queen of Romania. In 2005 it was acquired by the Paige family, owners of the Paige Glass Co.
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1905
The Sentinel Building was constructed in San Francisco just before the earthquake. The 8-story steel-framed "flatiron" structure with a copper dome at Columbus and Kearney was designed by Salfield & Kohlberg for the notorious political boss Abe Reuf. Reuf was later sent to San Quentin for his transgressions. In 1973 film director Francis Ford Coppola purchased the building for $500,000. In 1970 the building was named as a city landmark.
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1906
Frank Lloyd Wright designed the Westcott House in Springfield, Ohio. In 2000 the non-profit Westcott House Foundation purchased the house for $300,000 and then spent 5 years and $5.8 million in renovations.
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1907
Mario Ciampi, architect, was born in San Francisco.
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1907
In SF a 14-story, 71,345-square-foot building, designed by George Applegarth, was completed at Market and New Montgomery. In 2007 it sold for some $26 million.
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1907
In SF the building at 261 Columbus, designed by Oliver Everett, was completed. It later became the home of City Lights Bookstore.
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1907
In San Francisco a 2-story commercial building, designed by Sylvan Schnaittacher, was erected at 77 New Montgomery St. In 1920 3 stories, designed by Mel Schwartz, were added.
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1907
In San Francisco a 3-story building was built at 201 O’Farrell St. It was designed by Arthur Lamb. Marquard’s Little Cigar Store opened on the corner with a classic neon marquee.
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1907
In San Francisco the 6-story Legallet Building, designed by architect Albert Pissis, was completed at 615 Battery St.
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1907
In San Francisco a two-story glass warehouse was constructed at 50 Green St. It was designed by architects Willis Polk and George Wright.
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1908
In Montevideo, Uruguay, the neoclassical Palacio Legislativo was built to house the national legislature.
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1908
The Berkeley, Ca., City Hall was built in a Beaux Arts style. In 1977 a new City Hall was completed. In 2002 voters rejected a bond to fix it and in 2007 it faced $35 million in renovation and retrofit costs.
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1908
In SF the Humboldt Bank building at 785 Market St. was completed. The 19-story building featured a Beaux-Arts style and dome by the Meyer & O’Brien architectural firm.
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1908
In San Francisco the 3-story First Chinese Baptist Church was built at 15 Waverly Place. It was designed by G.E. Burlingame and incorporated clincker bricks giving the structure a medieval air.
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1908
In San Francisco the 6-story Maskey Building, designed by Haves and Toepke, was completed. In 1983 it was demolished, but 4 of the façade’s 6 bays were restored as the front of a 6-story wing of an office tower at 48 Kearny St.
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1908
In San Francisco the 3-story building at 556 Commercial St. was completed. It was designed by Charles M. Rousseau.
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1908
In San Francisco the classical-style building at 1 Montgomery St., designed by Willis Polk, was built. The 10 floors of offices above the base were removed in 1983 as part of a development trade-off that allowed a 38-story tower to rise to the west.
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1908
In San Francisco a 7-story building draped in terra cotta was built at 20 California St. It was designed by C.A. Meusdorrfer.
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1908
In SF the triangular, 11-story Phelan building, designed by William Curlett, was built at 760-784 Market St.
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1909
The Hearst Building in SF was constructed at Market and Third. It was remodeled in 1937 by Julia Morgan.
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1909
The 1,300-seat Columbia Theater was constructed in SF and named after a major venue destroyed by the 1906 earthquake. It was designed by Walter Bliss and William Faville, who also designed the St. Francis Hotel. In 1928 it was renamed the Geary Theater. It was badly damaged in the 1989 earthquake. It opened in 1910 with “Father and the Boys.”
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1909
In San Francisco the 4-story Hugo building was built at 200 Sixth St. It was designed by Theo W. Lenzen. In 1988 the residential hotel went empty. In 1997 Brian Goggin installed his “Defenstration” artwork featuring furniture apparently tumbling from the building’s windows. In 2009 San Francisco used eminent domain to acquire the property and planned demolition for new low-income housing.
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1909
In San Francisco a 6-story department store, designed by George A. Applegarth, was built at 1019 Market St. The Greek revival structure was framed by Corinthian columns.
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1909
In San Francisco the Renaissance revival-style Addison Head Building was built at 201 Post. It was designed by William Curlett.
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1910 Nov 27
In NYC the Pennsylvania Railroad began service at Pennsylvania Station. It was begun under the direction of PRR president Alexander J. Cassatt (d.1906) and designed by the architectural firm of McKim, Mead and White. In 2007 Jill Jonnes authored “Conquering Gotham: A Gilded Age Epic: The Construction of Penn Station and its Tunnels.” Penn Station was demolished in 1963.
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1911 May 15
Max Frisch (d.1991), Swiss architect and writer, was born.
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1911
In SF the Perine Mansion, designed by Conrad Meussdorffer, was built at 535 Powell St. It later became the home of Tessie Wall (d.1922), a SF madam.
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1911
In Stockholm, Sweden, construction began on a new city hall. The design was a mix of Italian Renaissance, Moorish and Byzantine style and was completed in 1923.
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1911
In SF the First St. John’s United Methodist Church, designed by George Washington Kramer, was constructed at Larkin and Clay. It went empty in 2005 as the church agreed to sell the land to Pacific Polk Properties to build a 27-unit condominium. It failed to attain status as a city landmark and was slated for demolition in 2009.
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1912
In San Francisco the Sharon Building was built by the descendants of William Sharon (1821-1885), a US senator from Nevada, who made his fortune in silver. It was designed by NYC architect George Kelham.
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1912
In San Francisco the Sprechels Mansion was built by sugar tycoon Adolph Sprechels at 2080 Washington St. The 3-story French classical home was designed by George Applegarth.
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1913 Feb 2
The new Grand Central Terminal in NYC opened. It first opened in 1871 and was rebuilt by Cornelius Vanderbilt at 42nd and Park Ave. It was designed by the architectural firms of Reed and Stem and Warren and Wetmore, and was extensively remodeled in 1998.
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1913
In San Francisco the 1910 67,000-square-foot building designed by architect Newton Tharp, was moved brick by brick to 170 Fell St. It was used by the SF Unified School District for administration until the 1989 earthquake.
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1913
In San Francisco the 11-story Flatiron Building, designed by Havens and Toepke, was built at 540 market St.
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1913
In Detroit the Michigan Central Depot railway station opened on Michigan Ave. It was designed by the same architects responsible for NYC’s Grand Central Station. The last train departed from the station in January, 1988, after which the structure was stripped by vandals. In 2009 it continued to stand, under owner Manuel Moroun, a trucking and real estate mogul, even as a dead body was found at the bottom of an elevator shaft.
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1913
In San Francisco the 2-story building at 200 Powell St. was built. The Art Moderne style was designed by Salfield and Kohlberg. It was remodeled in 1933 and 2008.
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1913
In San Francisco the Hotel Senate, aka Crescent Manor, opened at 467 Turk Street. It was designed by architect Charles J. Rousseau.
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1914 Aug 15
Mamah Borthwick Cheney, the mistress of Frank Lloyd Wright, was axed to death along with her 2 children and 4 others by a crazed servant at Wright’s rural Taliesin home. Wright restored the house, which was set aflame in the rampage. The house was ravaged by fire again in 1925 and again restored by Wright.
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1914
In Oakland, Ca., the Cathedral Building at 1615 Broadway and Telegraph was completed. It was designed by Benjamin McDougall.
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1915 Dec 28
San Francisco Mayor James Rolph Jr. dedicated the "new" $3.5 million City Hall. The French Renaissance Revival building, was designed by Arthur Brown Jr.
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1915
In San Francisco the 2-story Agriculture Building at 101 Embarcadero was built. It was designed by A.A. Pyle. It began life as a post office so mail ferries could pull right up.
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1915
The 38-story Equitable Building, located at 120 Broadway in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan, was completed. It was designed by Ernest R. Graham.
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1916 Oct 10
Antonio Sant’Elia (b.1888), Italian architect, was killed during the Eighth Battle of the Isonzo. He was a key member of the Futurist movement in architecture.
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