Home
Subject list

Antarctica

Next     Prev
Page: 1 2 3 4

1Bil BC
A billion years ago several mini-continents collided together to form a super-continent called Gondwana, creating a mountain range at the point of impact. Periods of rifting, some 250 million years ago and again about 100 million years ago, pulled Gondwana apart in tectonic agony. This created a 3,000-km (2,000-mile) fracture in the planet's crust that extends from East Antarctica across the ocean to India. A residual "root," combined with the rifting, helped force up the land that is now East Antarctica. Some 34 million years ago, the mountains became smothered by the East Antarctic icesheet, an area the size of Canada.
Links: Antarctica, HistoryBC     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
250Mil BC
In 2006 an apparent crater as big as Ohio was found in Antarctica. Scientists thought it was carved by a space rock that caused the greatest mass extinction on Earth about this time.
Links: Earth, Antarctica, HistoryBC     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
170Mil BC
In 2004 scientists reported the discovery in Antarctica of primitive sauropod, a plant-eating dinosaur, from this time.
Links: Dinosaur, Antarctica, HistoryBC     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
100Mil BC
In 2011 It was reported that the discovery of a single sauropod vertebra on James Ross Island in Antarctica reveals that these behemoths, which included Diplodocus, Brachiosaurus and Apatosaurus, lived on the continent about 100 million years ago.
Links: Dinosaur, Antarctica, HistoryBC     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
70Mil BC
In 2004 scientists reported the discovery in Antarctica of a small meat-eating therapod dinosaur from this time.
Links: Antarctica     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
We offer additional services to help you as well including tax attorney help with tax relief issues, auto accident attorney services, and sustainable development information to research going green!
20Mil BC
15Mil BC
In Antarctica a geologic basin formed during a tectonic upheaval that later led to the formation of the sub-glacial Lake Vostok.
Links: Antarctica     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
16Mil BC
A huge asteroid hit Mars and blasted rock into space about this time. The 1984 meteorite labeled Allan Hills (ALH) 84001 was knocked into space and landed in Antarctica around 11,000BC.
Links: Mars, Antarctica, Asteroid, HistoryBC, Meteor     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1.8Mil BC
1.2Mil BC
The Ross Sea off Antarctica was 6-7 degrees warmer. This was determined from shellfish fossils and 15 previously unknown species of algae found under the seabed off Cape Roberts.
Links: Antarctica     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1Mil BC
Lake Vostok was formed about this time. In 1999 it was about 12,000 feet below the ice surface and was about the size of Lake Ontario. Scientists discovered living bacteria and theorized that the lake was warmed either by hot magma beneath the Earth's crust or by the downward pressure of ice.
Links: Antarctica     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
12638 BC
A very rapid sea level rise is thought to have occurred 14,650 years ago but details about the event have been unclear. In 2012 scientists said the collapse of an ice sheet in Antarctica about this time might have caused sea levels to rise between 14 and 18 meters (46-60 feet).
Links: Antarctica, HistoryBC     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
International Red Cross
Make a donation
11000 BC
A meteorite from Mars (ALH 84001), discovered in 1984, landed in Antarctica. Scientists in 1996 claimed to have found evidence of organic minerals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, in the meteorite that formed some 3.6 billion years ago.
Links: Comet, Mars, Antarctica, HistoryBC, Meteor     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
8000 BC
About this time the West Antarctic ice sheet started retreating at a rate of about 2 inches per year.
Links: Antarctica     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1773 Jan 17
Captain James Cook became the first person to cross the Antarctic Circle (66d 33' S).
Links: Antarctica     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1809
A large volcanic eruption took place, but the exact location was unknown. Evidence was later found in ice cores of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets.
Links: Volcano, Antarctica, Greenland     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1820 Jan 30
Edward Bransfield discovered Antarctica and claimed it for the UK.
Links: Antarctica     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
You may send us a message, if you wish place an ad on this site.
1820 Nov 18
U.S. Navy Capt. Nathaniel B. Palmer discovered the frozen continent of Antarctica.
Links: Antarctica     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1837
French explorer Dumont d’Urville (1790-1842) sailed along a coastal area of Antarctica that he named the Adélie Coast in honor of his wife. He also named the Adelie penguin after his wife.
Links: France, Antarctica, Explorer, Birds     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1838 Aug 18
Six US Navy ships departed Hampton Roads, Va., led by Lt. Charles Wilkes on a 3-year mission called the US South Seas Exploring Expedition, the "U.S. Ex. Ex." The mission proved Antarctica to be a continent. Wilkes was tried in a military court for abuses of power, but was generally acquitted. In 2003 Nathaniel Philbrick authored "Sea of Glory," an account of the expedition.
Links: Antarctica     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1838
1842
Lt. Charles Wilkes led a 3-year mission called the US South Seas Exploring Expedition. In 1975 William Stanton authored “The Great United States Exploring Expedition.” In 1961 The American Phil. Society published “Titian Ramsay Peale, 1799-1885, And His Journals of the Wilkes Expedition.”
Links: Antarctica     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1840 Jan 19
Charles B. Wilkes, captain of the US flagship Vincennes, claimed the discovery of Antarctica. Wilkes Land was later named in his honor. The American explorer, born April 3, 1798, coasted along part of the Antarctic barrier from about 150 degrees east to 108 degrees east, the areas that were subsequently named Wilkes Land. Wilkes’ officers disputed the Jan 19 sighting but acknowledged that land was sighted Jan 28 and Feb 15.
Links: Antarctica     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
Timelines
A text-based site.
1901
Robert Falcon Scott made an expedition to the Antarctic. He noted the phenomena called “Earth shadows,” where long dark arrows would project into the sky early in the morning. They were later realized by explorer Ernest Shackleton [1914] to be shadows from the peaks of Mt. Erebus cast across the western mountains.
Links: Antarctica     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1907
1909
Murray Levick was the naturalist on the Ernest Shackleton south polar expedition. [see 1908]
Links: Antarctica     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1908
Ernest Shackleton's polar exploration team established a staging platform to Antarctica at Cape Royds, Ross Island. A prefab cabin was built big enough for 15 men.
Links: Antarctica     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1909 Jan 9
A Polar exploration team led by Ernest Shackleton reached 88 degrees, 23 minutes south longitude, 162 degrees east latitude. They were 97 nautical miles short of the South Pole, but the weather was too severe to continue.
Links: Antarctica     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1909 Jan 16
One of Ernest Shackleton's polar exploration teams reached the Magnetic South Pole.
Links: Antarctica     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
We offer additional services to help you as well including tax attorney help with tax relief issues, auto accident attorney services, and sustainable development information to research going green!
1909 Mar 23
British Lt. Shackleton found the magnetic South Pole.
Links: Antarctica     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1909
The Polar exploration team led by Ernest Shackleton abandoned its Antarctic expedition as winter ice formed and left behind 5 crates of whiskey and brandy. An Antarctic Heritage Trust team found the crates in 2006. One crate, labeled Mackinlay's whisky, was recovered in 2010 and shipped to New Zealand for testing.
Links: Liquor, Antarctica     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1910 Jun 15
British explorer Robert Falcon Scott departed Cardiff, Wales, on his Terra Nova Expedition to the Ross Sea and South Pole. Herbert Ponting (1870-1935) served as the expedition photographer and cinematographer. In this role, he captured some of the most enduring images of the Heroic Age of Antarctic Exploration.
Links: Britain, Antarctica, Explorer     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1911 Jan 2
The Terra Nova expedition led by Robert Falcon Scott reached the coast of Antarctica.
Links: Antarctica     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1911 Jun 27
Appsley Cherry-Gerrard, an English aristocrat and the youngest member of the Robert Falcon Scott South Pole expedition, began a 5 week expedition, lit by 5 hour-days of twilight, hauling a sledge on a hunt for pelican eggs that Scott wanted. He was accompanied by Lt. Henry Bowers and ornithologist Dr. Edward Wilson In 1922 he authored “The Worst Journey in the World.” The author was later part of the rescue party that eventually found the frozen bodies of Scott and three men who had accompanied Scott on the final push to the Pole.
Links: Britain, Antarctica, Books     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
International Red Cross
Make a donation
1911 Oct 19
A team, consisting of Olav Bjaaland, Helmer Hanssen, Sverre Hassel, Oscar Wisting, and Roald Amundsen set out from base camp Framheim on a 2nd to reach the South Pole. They reach the South Pole on Dec 14.
Links: Norway, Antarctica     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1911 Oct 24
Robert Scott's expedition left Cape Evans for South Pole.
Links: Antarctica     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1911 Nov 10
George Levick, a surgeon and the medical officer on Scott's famous 1910-1913 expedition to the South Pole, wrote in Greek (translated here): "This afternoon I saw a most extraordinary site [sic]. A Penguin was actually engaged in sodomy upon the body of a dead white throated bird of its own species. The act occurred a full minute, the position taken up by the cock differing in no respect from that of ordinary copulation, and the whole act was gone through down to the final depression of the cloaca."
Links: Sex, Antarctica, Birds     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1911 Dec 11
Roald Amundson, Norwegian explorer, reached the South Pole. [see Dec 14,15]
Links: Antarctica     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1911 Dec 14
Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen became the first man to reach the South Pole, beating an expedition led by Robert F. Scott. He use dog sleds that averaged fifteen miles a day in sub-zero temperatures. [see Dec 11]
Links: Antarctica     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
You may send us a message, if you wish place an ad on this site.
1911 Dec 15
Roald Amundson, Norwegian explorer, reached the South Pole. [see Dec 11,14] The best book on Scott and Amundson is by Roland Huntford "Scott and Amundson."
Links: Antarctica     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1912 Jan 16
British explorer Robert Falcon Scott wrote in his diary after reaching the South Pole on January 16, 1912, “Great God this is an awful place and terrible enough for us to have labored to it without the reward of priority.” Robert Scott, attempting to lead the first exploration party to the South Pole, wrote the passage after finding the black flag of Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen. Thoroughly demoralized, the five members of the Scott party died during their 800-mile trek back to their base camp. [see Jan 17,18]
Links: Antarctica     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1912 Jan 17
Robert Scott reached the South Pole only a month after Amundsen. [see Jan 16,17]
Links: Antarctica     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1912 Jan 18
A team of British Royal Navy Captain Robert Falcon Scott, and four others intended to be the first to reach the South Pole, but when they arrived, they found a letter from Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen--he had been there 36 days before. [see more]
Links: Antarctica     More  Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1912 Feb 15
The Fram reached latitude 78ø 41' S, farthest south ever by ship.
Links: Antarctica     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
Timelines
A text-based site.
1912 Mar 7
Roald Amundsen announced the discovery of the South Pole [see Dec 14, 1911].
Links: Norway, Antarctica     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1912 Mar 29
Capt. Robert F. Scott, British pole explorer, storm-bound in a tent near South Pole, made a last entry in his diary: "Last entry. For God's sake look after our people."
Links: Antarctica     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1912 Nov 12
Robert Scott's diary and dead body were found in Antarctica.
Links: Antarctica     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1912
The Australian Antarctic Expedition of 1911-1914 began using an airplane to tow gear onto the ice in preparation for their sledging journeys. The plane, the first from France's Vickers factory, had not been seen since the mid-1970s, when researchers photographed the steel fuselage nearly encompassed in ice. Australian researchers stumbled on remains of the plane on Jan 1, 2010.
Links: Australia, Aviation, Antarctica     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1914 Dec 5
Sir Ernest Shackleton left South Georgia Island on the HMS Endurance in the Weddell Sea in Antarctica.
Links: Antarctica     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
We offer additional services to help you as well including tax attorney help with tax relief issues, auto accident attorney services, and sustainable development information to research going green!
1915 Jan 18
The HMS Endurance, under Sir Ernest Shackleton and his 27 man crew, froze into the ice of Antarctica. In 1999 Caroline Alexander published "The Endurance: Shackleton's Legendary Antarctic Expedition."
Links: Antarctica     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1915 Aug 27
Frank Hurley, photographer, took a picture of the Endurance trapped in the ice.
Links: Antarctica     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1915 Oct 27
Ernest Shackleton and the crew of the Endurance abandoned their ship in the Antarctic ice.
Links: Antarctica     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1915 Nov 21
The HMS Endurance, under Sir Ernest Shackleton and his 27 man crew, sank in the Weddell Sea of Antarctica. The whole crew escaped on 3 lifeboats that included the “James Caird.” They drifted for 5 months and when the ice broke rowed to Elephant Island. Shackleton then rowed the Caird for 800 miles with 5 men to South Georgia Island and returned to pick up the 21 men left behind. Frank Hurley captured the sinking on 35-mm movie film. In 1933 F.A. Worsely, the captain of the Endurance, authored “Shackleton’s Boat Journey.” In 1999 Caroline Alexander authored “The Endurance.”
Links: Antarctica, Ship, Books     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1916 Apr 14
Sir Ernest Shackleton and his 27 man crew landed at Elephant Island off the Antarctic Peninsula.
Links: Antarctica     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
International Red Cross
Make a donation
1916 May 8
Sir Ernest Shackleton with 6 men man crew completed a 16-day voyage of 800 miles from Elephant Island to South Georgia Island in the lifeboat James Caird.
Links: Antarctica     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1916 May 20
Sir Ernest Shackleton with 2 men reached a whaling station on St. Georgia Island after their ship sank in the ice of Antarctica. Shackleton’s own account of the venture was titled: "South." In 1959 Alfred Lansing wrote “Endurance: Shackleton’s Incredible Voyage.” A biography of Shackleton was written in 1985 by Roland Huntford.
Links: Antarctica     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1916 Aug 30
Sir Ernest Shackleton rescued the crew he had left behind on Elephant Island.
Links: Antarctica     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1919
The documentary film “South” by Frank Hurley was about the Shackelton expedition to the Antarctic.
Links: Antarctica     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1921
Sir Ernest Shackleton sailed back to South Georgia.
Links: Antarctica     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
You may send us a message, if you wish place an ad on this site.
1922 Jan 5
Sir Ernest Shackleton (47) died of a heart attack at sea enroute from South Georgia Island to Antarctica. He was buried on South Georgia Island. In 1924 Hugh Robert Mill authored “The Life of Sir Ernest Shackleton.”
Links: Antarctica     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1929 Nov 28
Commander Richard E. Byrd completed the first South Pole flight. [see Nov 29]
Links: Antarctica     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1929 Nov 28
Commander Richard E. Byrd embarked on the first South Pole flight.
Links: USA, Aviation, Antarctica     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1929 Nov 29
Navy Lt. Cmdr. Richard E. Byrd radioed that he'd made the first airplane flight over the South Pole: "My calculations indicate that we have reached vicinity of South Pole." He was wrong. [see 1888-1957, Byrd]
Links: Antarctica     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
 
1929 Nov 29
Navy Lt. Cmdr. Richard E. Byrd radioed that he'd made the first airplane flight over the South Pole: "My calculations indicate that we have reached vicinity of South Pole." He was wrong [see 1888-1957, Byrd].
Links: USA, Aviation, Antarctica     Click to see the source(s) for this event 
Timelines
A text-based site.

Next     Prev
Page: 1 2 3 4



Go to top